Pesto made with Garlic Scapes, is almost better than Basil Pesto if you love garlic flavor.

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One of the great joys of growing hard neck garlic is that they form Scapes. The Scapes turn into flowers, but you want the energy of the plant to go into the bulb and not the flower so you need to cut the Scapes off. The Scapes are incredibly tasty and they make a lovely creamy garlic pesto! The Scapes start out very curly and this is when you want to cut them off. Eventually they will stand straight up, and this is when you know your garlic is ready to harvest. So, if you have lots of Scapes you might want to leave one or two so you know when to harvest. Cut them about where they start to grow out of the plant. Use about 12 inches of the top part. When you cut them you will notice that they become harder to cut, and the stalk becomes more woody, you want to use the easier to cut portion of the scape.

There are many versions of Garlic Scape pesto and they’re all pretty similar, but this is how I like to make it.

Garlic Scape Pesto

Ingredients:

  • 10 Garlic Scapes chopped into 2 inch pieces
  • 1/4 C of chopped Walnuts
  • 1 C of Romano or Asiago cheese or a blend of the two
  • 1 Heaping T of fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 C, plus maybe a T of Olive Oil (I use extra virgin)
  • Himalayan salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  • Place the garlic Scapes in a food processor and puree until they form a smooth paste, add the lemon juice, walnuts, cheese and olive oil and blend until you have a creamy pesto. Add the salt and pepper and blend a bit more.
  • Pesto freezes well, so make as much as you can while you have Scapes and freeze it for later use or it will last for a couple of weeks in the fridge.
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Urban Gleaning and Breakfast Cereal

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Both my husband and I grew up in homes where we were taught to live by high moral standards, values and integrity.  We have to laugh though, because when we tell his mother that we are going “Urban Gleaning,” we think she goes and prays for us. In her mind she’s thinking, “I have to pray for my son and daughter-in-law, they’re stealing fruit!” In our defense we only glean where we’ve asked to pick the fruit, or on abandoned lots, or in public places where it’s allowed. On many of our hikes we’ve found mulberries, currants, apples and blackberries. Most of our gleaning comes from friends or neighbors, who have fruit trees and simply cannot process and eat all their fruit. Many folks don’t want to take the time to cut the worms out of the apples, so they allow us to pick all we want. If we pick, process and freeze, then we have the fruit we need in our freezer for many breakfasts.  We like Urban Gleaning, it’s an adventure!

We enjoy this recipe so much that I make it often with slight variations depending on what fruit(s) I have. Plus, it can be reheated in a toaster oven and served for a few days.

Option 1: Breakfast Cereal – Specific Carbohydrate Diet Legal

Preheat oven to 375. Oil or butter an 8×8 baking dish.

  • 4 Cups Fruit cut into pieces
  • ½ C of Honey or less depending on taste
  • 3 C of Almond Flour
  • ½ C of shredded Almonds
  • ½ C of chopped Walnuts
  • 1 tsp of Cinnamon
  • ½ tsp of Nutmeg
  • ½ Stick of Butter chopped or 2 heaping Tablespoons of Coconut Oil
  • Optional 1 C of Raisins

Put 4 Cups of cut up fruit (fresh or frozen) into dish, add up to ½ C of honey and pour over fruit. In a separate bowl, combine 3 C of almond flour, shredded almonds, chopped walnuts, 1 tsp of cinnamon, ½ tsp of nutmeg and cut up butter or coconut oil and work that into the flour and nuts until it resembles coarse crumbs. Pour that mixture over the fruit and work in with a fork. Bake at 375 for about 40 mins or until golden brown. Enjoy!

Option 2: Breakfast Cereal

Preheat oven to 375. Oil or butter an 8×8 baking dish.

  • 4 Cups Fruit cut into pieces
  • ½ C of Honey or Sugar or less depending on taste
  • 1 C of Almond Flour or Whole Wheat Flour,
  • 2-3 C Oats
  • ½ C of shredded Almonds
  • ½ C of chopped Walnuts
  • ¼ C of Chia Seeds
  • ¼ C ground Flax Seed
  • 1 tsp of Cinnamon
  • ½ tsp of Nutmeg
  • ½ Stick of Butter chopped or 2 heaping Tablespoons of Coconut Oil
  • Optional 1 C of Raisins

Put 4 Cups of cut up fruit (fresh or frozen) into dish, add up to ½ C of honey or sugar and pour over fruit. In a separate bowl, combine flour and oats, shredded almonds, chopped walnuts, chia seeds, flax, 1 tsp of cinnamon, ½ tsp of nutmeg and cut up butter or coconut oil and work that into the flour and nuts until it resembles coarse crumbs. Pour that mixture over the fruit and work in with a fork. Bake at 375 for about 40 mins or until golden brown. Enjoy!

This option can be served warm with milk.

 

Why we love our Kale and Beets!

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Before starting the Specific Carbohydrate diet (SCD) thirteen years ago, kale and beets were not part of our regular diet, in fact, we never ate them. Today we not only eat them regularly, we also grow them! If you’re not a gardener you can find them in most grocery stores and farmer’s markets. In this article, I’m going to tell you why kale and beets are so beneficial to your health and share a couple of favorite recipes.

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